December 15, 2007-April 26, 2008

 

The artists featured in this exhibition include:

Click + for enlarged image

Gallery Selections of California Modernism - 1920s, 1930s and 1940s

This exhibition features stunning and fresh artworks by Victor Arnautoff, Karoly Fulop, John Haley, Peter Krasnow, Erle Loran, Helen Clark Oldfield, Otis Oldfield, Zygmund Sazevich, and many others. We also are featuring some of the Gallery’s favorite artworks by California’s foremost Modernists. The exhibition includes oil paintings, watercolors, sculpture, drawings and prints.

A color brochure of the exhibition is available upon request.

 

Victor Arnautoff

California Modernism - Gallery Selections

Karoly Fulop

John Haley

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Peter Krasnow

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Erle Loran

Helen Clark Oldfield

Otis Oldfield

Zygmund Sazevich

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
   
   
   
   

August 4, 2007 – November 3, 2007

 

The artists featured in this exhibition include:

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The Nude in California Modernism

In classical antiquity the nude was a revered and frequently depicted artistic subject. The reverence for the nude as art would wax and wane over the centuries due in part to changing societal mores. The experimentation occasioned by the advent of Modernism brought new freedom to artists wishing to express their ideas about the human form. European avant-garde movements influenced to varying degrees California artists working in the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s. This exhibition explores some of the ways that the California Modernists interpreted the most intimate of subjects – the human body.

A color brochure of the exhibition is available upon request.

 

Mabel Alvarez

California Modernism - Gallery Selections

Victor Arnautoff

Claude Buck

Alexander Cañedo

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Brents Carlton

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Ralph Chessé

Russell Cowles

Lorser Feitelson

Paul Landacre

Helen Clark Oldfield

Otis Oldfield

Bernard Baruch Zakheim

   
   
   
   
   
August 4, 2007 – November 3, 2007  

The artworks featured in this exhibition include:

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Back Room Gallery | Jeffrey oldfieldO- The California Modernist Landscape Evolved

This exhibition highlights a small portion of the artistic journey of one of California’s foremost Modernist artists.

By the late 1920s, Otis Oldfield, a progressive artist in the truest sense, had experimented with many artistic styles, including Cubism, Fauvism, and even his own “color block” theory. That experimentation would lead in the early 1930s to Oldfield’s “Neo-Realist” style of painting and, by the late 1930s, to experimentation with figuration.

In his “Neo-Realist” canvases, Oldfield depicted urban scenes, portraits and even nudes literally, even too literally some might say, as in his 1935 Study for “The Comb.”

By the end of 1936 his “Neo-Realism” began to give way to a much freer and dissociative style of painting — Oldfield’s early experimentation with what would become known as Bay Area Figuration. Nude on White Drape and the series of nude studies in this exhibition reveal the Artist’s new manner of depicting the figure. The brushstrokes are few, just sufficient to define a space, a mood, and the human form, without giving the figure true definition.

Oldfield’s experimentation with figuration reached a new level with his “Neo-Impressionist” paintings. This work, as in Seated Figure from 1948, is characterized by the quick brushstrokes used to capture a moment in time, but with attention to detail sufficient to give definition to the figure and to capture the soft light dappling the subject’s body.

The progression from Neo-Realism through Bay Area Figuration reflects the experimentation of an artist with a fertile and open mind. Otis Oldfield’s work was a precursor to that of the Bay Area Figurative School and by the time that group had reached prominence he already had moved into yet another period of artistic exploration.

 

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Study for ‘The Comb’

Back Room Gallery

Nude on White Drape

Young Nude

Nude on Orange Drape

Nude in Brown Chair

Nude with Bouquet

Nude with Serape

Sitting Figure

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   

April 14, 2007 - July 28, 2007

 

The artists featured in this exhibition include:

Click + for enlarged image

The California Modernist Landscape

The California Modernist Landscape is a sweeping overview of Modernist rural and urban landscape art by artists working in Northern and Southern California during the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s.

Modernism was introduced to California in a number of ways including by artists returning from France and other destinations in the late 1910s and early 1920s, such as Otis Oldfield in San Francisco and Stanton Macdonald Wright in Los Angeles. These artists and others helped to influence their students and fellow artists to view the landscape in new and different ways. Artists no longer merely reproduced the landscape on canvas, but instead interpreted it.

• Northern California artists featured in this exhibition include Ruth Armer, Victor Arnautoff, Raymond Bertrand, Margaret Bruton, Ralph Chessé, Rinaldo Cuneo, William Hesthal, Nils Gren, Erle Loran, Helen Clark Oldfield, Otis Oldfield, Louis Siegriest and Frede Vidar.

• Southern California artists featured in this exhibition include Edward Biberman, Florence Parker Bloser, Grace Clements, Merrell Gage, Peter Krasnow, Paul Landacre, Warren Newcombe, Lillian Whiting and Stanton Macdonald Wright.

A color brochure of the exhibition is available upon request.

 

Victor Arnautoff

California Modernism - Gallery Selections

Ralph Chessé

Rinaldo Cuneo

Merrell Gage

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William Hesthal

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Raymond Leroy Hill

Peter Krasnow

Helen Clark Oldfield

Otis Oldfield

Frede Vidar

 
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
April 14, 2007 - July 28, 2007  

The artworks featured in this exhibition include:

Click + for enlarged image

Back Room Gallery | Jeffrey Kirby - The California Modernist Landscape Evolved

We are pleased to introduce to our patrons Southern California artist Jeffrey Kirby. Mr. Kirby is a graduate of St. Mary’s College of Maryland where he studied English and art. He later continued his art studies for a time at the Corcoran School of Art in Washington D.C. His works have been exhibited at many private galleries and are in numerous private and corporate collections.

In his art, Mr. Kirby juxtaposes vibrant color with the sensual forms of nature, creating works that are inspired by and reminiscent of the important work of the American Regionalists of the 1930s, including Thomas Hart Benton, John Steuart Curry, Grant Wood, and Mr. Kirby’s own favorite, Alexandre Hogue. While inspired by these artists, Mr. Kirby’s work represents his own “provocative vision of nature.” There is a unique perspective captured in his work, one that engages and draws in the viewer.

 

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Adagio

Back Room Gallery

After the Rain

Blue Skies

Lunch Break

Morning Mountains #2

Near the Vineyard

The New Fence

The Road Around

Rolling Hills, Cambria

Virgin Morning